By: Lea Speyer, Breaking Israel News

Iran’s Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei took Israel to war Wednesday on Twitter. Unleashing a tirade against the Jewish state, Khamenei vowed that Israel would cease to exist in 25 years.

“After negotiations, in Zionist regime they said they had no more concern about Iran for next 25 years; I’d say: Firstly, you will not see 25 years. God willing, there will be nothing as Zionist regime by next 25 years. Secondly, until then, struggling, heroic and jihadi morale will leave no moment of serenity for Zionist,” the Iranian leader tweeted.

In a second tweet, regarding the nuclear agreement reached between the Islamic Republic and world powers, Khamenei wrote, “We allowed negotiations with U.S. only on nuclear issue for certain reasons, in other areas we did not and will not allow negotiations with U.S.”

Khamenei warned that while “U.S. officials seek negotiation with Iran; negotiations is means of infiltration and imposition of their wills.”

Referring to the US as the “Great Satan,” the Iranian leader continued his tirade against the West, tweeting, “Iranian nation did expel this Great Satan; we barred their direct access and now we must not allow their indirect access and infiltration.”

In response to Khamenei’s threats, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu dismissed the his comments, calling the supreme leader a “tyrant” and vowing that Israel is here to stay.

“Khamenei is not giving supporters of the agreement any room for illusion. He has made it clear that the US is the Great Satan and that Iran intends to destroy the State of Israel,” the prime minister stated. “This will not happen. Israel is a strong country and it will become even stronger.”

US lawmakers have only a few more weeks before heading to a vote on whether to approve or reject the Iran nuclear deal. As of Tuesday, 42 senators have announced their support for the agreement, allowing US President Barack Obama to prevent Congress from disapproving the deal.

Forty-two votes are the minimum number of votes needed in the 100-member Senate to block a Republican resolution blocking the deal.